Environmental Law News
June 2020

The purpose of this Weekly Environmental Law News Update is to provide the latest environmental news stories and legal analysis in a readily accessible format concentrating on the week’s three key headlines.

To subscribe to receive our Environmental Law Updates by email click here.

From January 2018, a monthly environmental law news podcast presented by Christopher Badger, in association with LexisPSL will also be available.

To keep up-to-date contact Bridget Tough bridget.tough@6pumpcourt.co.uk to be added to the mailing list. If you have any comments or suggestions please get in touch.

Posted on: 24 June 2020

Environmental Law News Update

In this latest Environmental Law News Update, Charles Morgan, Christopher Badger and Mark Davies consider the effectiveness of the Bathing Water Directive, the UK Citizens Climate Assembly’s efforts to explore how the UK can achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and further caselaw on Aarhus costs capping orders in judicial review.

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Posted on: 16 June 2020

Environmental Law News Update

In this latest Environmental Law News Update, Charles Morgan, Christopher Badger and Mark Davies consider mustard gas dumped in a Nottinghamshire lake, a challenge to the Department for Transport’s ‘Road Investment Strategy 2’ and COVID-19 waste in the seas and on the beaches.

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Posted on: 9 June 2020

Environmental Law News Update

In this latest Environmental Law News Update, Charles Morgan, Gordon Wignall and William McBarnet consider whether a green industrial revolution is on the horizon, another case dealing with the treatment of waste material on shipment and a useful report on the economic regulation of the water industry in England and Wales.

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Posted on: 2 June 2020

Environmental Law News Update

In this latest Environmental Law News Update, Charles Morgan, Nicholas Ostrowski and William McBarnet consider development consent orders for nationally significant infrastructure projects, further clarification of the circumstances in which an Environmental Impact Assessment (‘EIA’) will be required and the practical ability of the water industry to react to supply shortages.

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